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horror toys

Warpo photo
He knows you've been naughty
Warpo is bringing the seasons greetings with a Kickstarter for a Krampus plush! It even includes a 80s/90s-themed toy commercial! The Krampus is a formerly obscure mythological counterpart to Saint Nicholas (ie, Santa Claus) ...

Horror photo
That which quacks cannot eternal lie
Do you like ducks? How about Cthulhu? Douglas Prince combines the best of both worlds with Dthulhu, a "rubber duck" version of Cthulhu and it's available through an IndieGoGo campaign. Whether in the tub or on the shelf, Dthu...

DST photo
Battle Beasts is back, baby! (kinda)
Good news and great news: Diamond Select Toys has released images & details for 20 of the collectibles on display at NYCC... and it includes some Battle Beasts! Regular readers may recall my borderline obsession with DST'...

Disney photo
Halloween is just 10 days away!
Just a day after a director confirmed that yes, Nightmare Before Christmas is a Halloween movie*, Diamond Select Toys' Zach Oat has put together a video showcasing the new Nightmare Before Christmas Minimates. The video expla...

DST photo
Spooky cool
As we draw nearer to Halloween, Diamond Select Toys has quite a few spooky(ish) items that will be showing up at retail this week. The selection includes the Femme Fatales Cassie Hack (Hack/Slash), a Ghostbusters Slimer pizza...

Disney photo
What, don't you have a Halloween tree?
Looking for some coffin-stuffers? Funko has a new series of Nightmare Before Christmas Mystery Minis on the way as well as a Pocket Pop! Vampire Teddy. This marks the second NBC Mystery Minis series we've seen. The new figure...

Funko photo
Oh, the horror! And the anime!
Funko has released photos of its upcoming Horror Classics Series 2 and Best of Anime Mystery Minis. This new Horror Classics Series is a long-awaited follow-up to Series 1 which graced collectors' shelves around 2 years ago. ...

Horror photo
Do ghosts get vacuumed up with a pop?
Guillermo del Toro's upcoming horror film Crimson Peak isn't going to hit theaters until October 16, but horror collectibles fans won't have to wait that long for the film's merchandise as Funko plans to release three Po...

Halloween photo
Cue the catcalls
I'm not sure how many of you are old enough to remember this, but once upon a time Halloween was a children's holiday devoted to things like trick or treating (and, before that, there was some Pagan stuff going on). However, ...

Gorgoloid photo
Corroders of wallets
It came from the sea! ...or rather, it will come from the sea. Gorgoloid will be selling a new wave of six one-off Kaiju Rhaal figures at 6 PM PST tonight. Each 5-inch figure is hand-cast, hand-dyed, and hand-painted (it just...

Horror photo
Perfect for boys and ghouls of every age
Funko has shown off a variety of cute-ifying (or terro-cuting?) collectibles, perfect for scaring your inner child! The selection including Pop! keychains and Pocket Pop!s for Disney's Nightmare before Christmas and various h...


Hop on down for the EE-exclusive Hikari Jiangshi

Jun 22
// Scarecroodle
Entertainment Earth recently gave us a heads-up regarding a neat store exclusive: the Hikari "Mythos" Sheriff. Limited to just 300 pieces, Funko's Hikari "Mythos" Sheriff is apparently based on the legendary monster from Chin...
Cthulhu photo
Hey, is he glowing or am I just crazy?
How is Warpo following up its giant 12-inch Cthulhu? By offering a limited edition glow-in-the-dark variant! The GitD variant is limited to a 300 piece run and should appeal to fans of classic-styled toys of a bygone era. The...

Supernatural photo

Funko goes spooky with Supernatural Mystery Minis

Fall in love with a spooky lil set
Jun 15
// Scarecroodle
Funko aims to delight (and perhaps frighten) fans with a Mystery Minis series devoted to the hit CW show Supernatural. This blind-boxed series consisting of 17 figurines is due out in July. The roster includes: Two versions ...
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AFX bringing awesome DST collectibles to SDCC -- including Supergirl!

Finally, people will enjoy July!
May 23
// Scarecroodle
Diamond Select Toys has revealed that the Femme Fatales Supergirl seen at Toy Fair will an Action Figure Xpress (AFX) exclusive variant --- available at SDCC! The other exclusives to be sold at the AFX booth (#3345) will incl...
DST photo

DST's Fall offerings will have you throwing your money at your screen

In Fall, your bank's balance falls
May 11
// Scarecroodle
Diamond Select Toys is ready to relentlessly hammer at your bank account with an array of AWESOME. DST recently posted its upcoming Fall offerings which includes an array of TV, movie, comic figures, and more! First and forem...
Horror photo

ABC's of Death 2 features a wicked toy commercial parody

When a toy commercial suddenly goes sideways
Mar 12
// Scarecroodle
ABC's of Death 2 is finally available via Netflix Instant (streaming service), meaning that I've finally been able to watch the sequel to the bizarre 26-story anthology. Thankfully it's FAR better than its predecessor and eve...
Gremlins photo
May play around with this one
NECA recently released some official product images for its upcoming Gremlins 2: The New Batch video game Mohawk. The most amusing of this images puts the figure in the game itself. Fans may recall that the 1990 video game wa...

Horror photo
Equally crazy? The US$100 MSRP!
Have you ever felt that your life was incomplete? Missing, say, a 12-inch tall figure of Lovecraft's most iconic creation? Then you're in luck because Warpo has plans to release a massive 12-inch Cthulhu figure which should s...

Horror photo
Which, in this case, just means selling at max 750 copies
Funko's newest Hikari is a platinum deco for Frankenstein, currently available for pre-order. "Platinum" Frankenstein, who is limited to a 750-piece run, sports a relatively plain metallic deco. While I'm not necessarily sure...

Horror photo
Magic wand, make my monster GLOW!
Funko's previously revealed Pop! Cthulhu not scary enough for you? What if he had red eyes? And glowed in the dark? Entertainment Earth will be exclusively selling such a variant which looks just as cool as the first version ...

Horror photo
Pre-order madness, that is!
Dread Central has been given a sneak peek at Diamond Select Toys' upcoming Cthulhu vinyl "idol" bank. And yes, this is easily among the coolest things that DST has done all year and is certainly an insta-buy for most horror f...

X-Files photo
The truth? Your shelves can't handle the truth!
Before there was Californication, David Duchovny starred in a little known scifi/horror/drama tv series called the X-Files. Maybe you've heard of it? The show ran for around nine years and is widely considered one of the grea...

Horror photo
Or on this word, I never saw This Island Earth
Funko unveiled its Hikari Metaluna Mutant (of This Island Earth fame, which you may have seen on Mystery Science Theater 3000) on Halloween (what, no Hikari Dracula?). Limited to a good-sized 1,500 pieces, the Metaluna Mutant...

Toys of Yesterday: Monster in My Pocket

Oct 31 // Scarecroodle
In the beginning, there were 48. The Monster in My Pocket franchise franchise launched around 1991 with its first series of 48 mono-colored soft rubber monster figurines and an accompanying trading card set. The figures were *intended* to also be game pieces (following in the tradition of things like Battle Beasts) and subsequently each figure featured a point value on its back. When two monsters "fought", the one with the higher point value won. Although a stupid gimmick, it helped break the figures up and establish some as being more important than others. The initial release made use of only four colors: yellow, purple, red, and green. Although the figures appeared in multiple colors, the rarer value versions either appeared in fewer colors, or the color swaps were rarer. The very common figures (5-point and 10-point, like Spring-heeled Jack) could frequently be seen in any of the thee colors. The initial package configurations mainly consisted of 4-packs that featured visible 5 & 10-point monsters along with more expensive 12-packs which featured one visible 25-point monster while the rest were random. Thus, somewhat ironically, it was easier to get the 25-point monster you wanted than either a 15 or 25-pointer. The 25-pointers, the big dogs in the yard, were the Great Beast, Behemoth, the Hydra, the Werewolf, the Griffin, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex. I'm still not sure why the Werewolf deserved the honor but, at the time, I didn't question it. Werewolves were cool. I believe I owned two copies of the Werewolf and managed to misplace both. In fact, these are surprisingly easy to lose. I even misplaced two figures while shooting these photos! Speaking of losing figures, what I can find of my original collection doesn't even fill a small container (I probably owned roundabouts of 150 or 200 from the early series). Given that these were my original figures, I've kept them separate from the figurines that I've picked up since then. After all, these figures were a part of my childhood while those other figures were a part of someone else's. The first series featured a different mix of monster types. This included classic movie monsters such the ghost, the mummy, a zombie, Frankenstein's Monster (just called "The Monster" in the guide), a vampire, and a vampiress. As a kid, these were probably the monsters you knew very well. However, it also featured famous mythological monsters like the griffin, Medusa, the hydra, cyclops, and the ogre. These were monsters you had probably heard of or seen on tv, in movies, etc. Going a bit deeper, there were also mythological monsters (and characters) you probably hadn't heard of as a kid, like Coatlique, the Wendigo, the many-headed Jotun troll (who appears in that Epcot viking ride), the Cockatrice, the Catoblepas, and Karnak. More controversially you had things like Kali, an actively worshipped Hindu goddess (who, by her inclusion, is viewed as a monster). She was one of the characters who would be renamed when the series relaunched in the early 2000s. I will say that I liked this figure as a kid. It was a cool design. Also, in case you were wondering if it got more offensive, they did Ganesha in series 2. Naturally two of my favorite things were associated with the lore: the monster checklist (seen right) which came in almost every figure configuration and the cards (seen left). Back when 7-11 was giving away (or selling?) promo packs with a limited number of cards, you better believe I was always trying to get my parents to go to 7-11. The cards were also just sold 11 to a pack. Each one features some neat character artwork on the front (pictured next to some of the figures) and a bio on the back. The style of the cardback varied based on the monsters' point values. Amusingly enough, the coolest design was given to the 20-point monsters instead of the 25-pointers. The cards don't necessarily explain the rationales behind the point values. Personally, the series may have marked the first time that I had even heard of a few of these monsters (possibly including the witch Baba Yaga or the fearsome Manticore). It helped to foster a love of mythology. (Side-note: While Manticores are usually depicted with the head of a man (with multiple rows of teeth), a lion's body, and a scorpion tail, this version opts for a pincher tail. While I don't understand the change, it does look cooler.) Some of my favorite figures from that first series were Cerberus, the Cyclops, the Ogre, Medusa, (I don't know why I have a second Cyclops there but hey, he was really cool), the Jotun Troll, and the Gremlin. Naturally that number also included the Werewolf and Roc, neither of which I have a copy of any more. Series 1 probably represented the line's highest point in some ways. There were a lot of promotional items (including variant colors of these monsters for people who might want a pink Wendigo; with the alternate colored versions from promos and other markets it can be hard to know a bootleg) and tie-ins, including a battle card game which I never learned how to play. Matchbox naturally wanted to capitalize on the existing success so they took things in a weird (and very annoying) direction. Series 2 expanded the line with another 24 monsters (basically they were just trying to crank *something* out). Besides the selection being weaker, Matchbox must have thought that they needed to one-up the previous offerings (maybe because they were giving half the selection?). But how would they go about that? First, the line used obnoxious neon colors. Figures were available in neon green, neon pink (because boys, the primary consumer of this product, just love hot pink), neon blue, and neon orange. But wait, there's more! To show that these figures were "cooler" than the previous set, the point values instead ranged from 10 to 30. How could they possibly top that? Meet the "Super Scary" line, a series of 24 multi-colored monsters... who went all the way up to 100 points. Oh, and did I mention that some glow in the dark? Looking back now, the series reeks of desparation. The actual sculpting, in many cases, was nowhere near as nice as either series 1 or 2. The figures were also a bit larger than the originals (because bigger is better?!). Even as a kid, I didn't like these that much. The series consisted almost entirely of things you'd never heard of yet they were stronger the more famous creatures, often outrageously so. The point system effectively backfired. I lost interest in the line and, reportedly, so did America. The line was mostly sold in Europe and Latin America after that. There was a relaunch in the 2000s which updated many of the designs (and replaced some of the politically incorrect names), but it was produced by a different company and basically limited to the UK and other regions outside the U.S.. It apparently didn't last long and, because of the scarce supply, the figures tend to sell for quite a bit more than the original series. Oh, and that tv show? It never made it past the special. Monster in My Pocket was a really neat line and it's a shame that its success (in the U.S.) was so brief. The figurines themselves still hold up remarkably well (the first series or two, anyway) thanks to an attention to detail. They're also reasonably inexpensive if you want to pick some up. If you want to learn more, be sure to check out the wiki.
Monster in My Pocket photo
Is that a monster in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?
Before there were Pocket Monsters (Pokemon), there was Monster in My Pocket. This surprisingly basic toy series would go on to have its own video game, tv show*, comics, trading cards, a board game, and a TON of pointless pro...

Horror photo
Get ready for pre-order madness
The end may be upon us, as Cthulhu has not only woken up but rolled out of bed into Funko's Pop! line. Even more frightening? He's currently available for pre-order! Cthulhu will be the third character to appear in Funko's Po...

Tomopop Review: DST's Creature from the Black Lagoon

Oct 29 // Scarecroodle
Figure Name: Universal Monsters Select Creature from the Black Lagoon Ver. 2Figure Maker: Diamond Select ToysRetail Price: US$24.99 (or around US$15 for the TRU version, if you can find it in stores)Available at: Diamond Select Toys | Entertainment Earth Long time readers may recall that the Gill-man, a.k.a. "the Creature", is by far my favorite Universal Monster. After all, I've only mentioned it, oh, a good forty or fifty times over the years including the occasional lengthy story about a time when Toys "R" Us refused to sell me one of my grail figures. If you read that story, you'll recall that I barely had time to enjoy that long-sought version of the Gill-man before DST dropped this awesome bomb... about a full year and a half before it was set to release. The plain Select packaging does little to convey how awesome this figure is. Like many of the other movie figures, the inner box is basically devoid of decoration (the popular Marvel Select line, by contrast, usually fills that space up with comic art). I imagine that it's probably due to a cost issue associated with licensing old movie stills or the such. The back of the box shows off Gill-man and provides a little backstory that wisely only references the first film (and leaves out the fact that he would eventually walk among us). Also included on the back is the Son of Frankenstein version of Frankenstein's Monster which closes out the wave (well, I guess there's also the DST-original version of Van Helsing but he's technically not part of the series) and, for that matter, the series. That's right, after giving fans a super-articulate Gill-man DST decided to drop the mic and walk away. DST's Gill-man stands close to 8-inches tall and features impeccable sculpting (courtesy of the game-changing Jean St. Jean, the sculptor behind figures like the much-praised MS Venom) along with a surprisingly deep paint job. Jean St. Jean has really pushed some boundaries in recent years, demonstrating that you don't have to sacrifice sculpt for articulation, which shines through in this figure. That said, the sculpting and articulation aren't blended to perfection. There are at least a few points where the joints are hindered by the sculpting (particularly at the head which looks as if it's jointed for a good amount of forward/back motion but the sculpt doesn't accommodate that). However, and this is important, in no place on this figure does the articulation truly hinder the sculpt. The joints, while somewhat visible, generally don't detract from the figure's overall appearance (with the possible exception of the exposed thigh pins). The overall craftsmanship is incredible. The character design itself facilitates many of these hidden joints, with hanging scales/platelets covering elbow and thigh cuts, for instance. The articulation represents a hodgepodge of different jointing concepts. The hands feature rotation at the lower wrists with a single pin-joint right above them (you may recall a similar trick being used on the Retro Cloth Phantom of the Opera (reviewed)). The elbows sport a kind of ball-joint which *could* have been used at the wrists as well, but the combo that was chosen instead helps to keep the wrists from looking ungainly. (EDITOR'S NOTE: My copy has a damaged right wrist (at the point of rotation) where the joint is jammed and, if a previous Select figure was any indication, the part will fall off if the joint is forced.) The head rotates, but his gills can get stuck on the frill running along his back. The torso features two joints, one directly above the abdomen with a second at the waist. While it doesn't work anywhere near as well as I had hoped (the forward/back is limited), you get a wide range of natural-looking rotation. The hips feature forward and outward motion, but are a little impeded by the sculpt (it's not a major issue). There's a thigh cut which offers rotation and helps with posing. The knees and ankles both feature single-pinned joints, a design choice that leads to only average balance. For the most part, the Select Gill-man can do most of the things you may want. The jointing isn't perfect, but it's worlds better than any previous version of the character that I can think of, especially within the affordable price ranges. It's worth remembering that Toys "R" Us also has an exclusive version of this figure. Priced closer to US$15, the biggest difference might be in the choice of accessories. The Select version gets an exquisitely designed underwater "swim" stand/base (seen here) while the Toys "R" Us version gets a smaller, generic stand. While the design is nice enough on its own for a background piece, it's intended for so much more. The product images on the packaging stupidly doesn't show the fact that the Gill-man can be posed right on the rock to recreate a swimming scene. It's something that DST fans will remember from a previous image on the DST Facebook page, but this awesome feature just isn't advertised. Granted, there's no piece or peg to actually hold him in place. The stand is just designed that the Gill-man can rest on it from certain angles. It's also, as DST Zach told me, the big reason for giving the Select Gill-man all of his articulation: the figure was designed to swim. Knowing this, I'm absolutely baffled why this gimmick doesn't have proper billing. Did DST feel that the trick might be too difficult for some fans? Diamond Select Toys has released quite a few Gill-man figures (including the first Select figure seen left and The Munters Select Uncle Gilbert (reviewed) seen right). While I don't have all of them (for instance, I'm missing the vinyl bank busts and the Retro Cloth version (which was hard to find at retail)), this new Select Gill-man is definitely my favorite and quite possibly my favorite among the Gill-man collectibles that I've owned over the years. Yes, it's not quite as awesome as I had assumed but it hits all of the right areas and features some great worksmanship. Plus perfect is overrated anyway, right? [A sizable spooky thanks to DST for sending over this review sample.]
Review: Gill-man photo
Not to be confused with the Creature from the Black & White Lagoon
Diamond Select Toys has taken quite a few stabs at the Universal Studios classic movie monsters, albeit with somewhat mixed results. Early entries often took a more statuesque approach, focusing on the sculpt rather than the ...

Supernatural photo

Hello, boys: King of Hell Crowley introduced to Pop! line

The devil is in the details
Oct 28
// Scarecroodle
Funko's last few Supernatural announcements prompted the expected, "Where the hell is Crowley?", questions. That question has finally been answered with a definitive, "Here he is!", when Funko unveiled everybody's favorite Ki...
Disney photo
Two items to make the Halloween season a little more joyful
The Haunted Mansion is easily among Disneyland's most iconic rides and even spawned its own film starring Eddie Murphy (which was nowhere near as successful as another ride's film series...), but collectibles have been a litt...

Horror photo
T'is the season
Funko this week announced plans to release another two Frankenstein redecos to its Hikari line. The funky, eye-catching "Glitter Shock" Frankenstein (limited to 1,200 pieces) features a translucent, glittery design while the ...

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